Culture shock in outsourced film

See Values Dissonancefor when this happens to the audience. There's also Pop-Culture Isolation.

Culture shock in outsourced film

Honeymoon[ edit ] During this period, the differences between the old and new culture are seen in a romantic light. For example, in moving to a new country, an individual might love the new food, the pace of life, and the locals' habits. During the first few weeks, most people are fascinated by the new culture.

They associate with nationals who speak their language, and who are polite to the foreigners. Like most honeymoon periods, this stage eventually ends. Excitement may eventually give way to unpleasant feelings of frustration and anger as one continues to experience unfavorable events that may be perceived as strange and offensive to one's cultural attitude.

Language barriers, stark differences in public hygiene, traffic safety, food accessibility and quality may heighten the sense of disconnection from the surroundings. Still, the most important change in the period is communication: People adjusting to a new culture often feel lonely and homesick because they are not yet used to the new environment and meet people with whom they are not familiar every day.

The language barrier may become a major obstacle in creating new relationships: In the case of students studying abroad, some develop additional symptoms of loneliness that ultimately affect their lifestyles as a whole.

Due Culture shock in outsourced film the strain of living in a different country without parental support, international students often feel anxious and feel more pressure while adjusting to new cultures—even more so when the cultural distances are wide, as patterns of logic and speech are different and a special emphasis is put on rhetoric.

Adjustment[ edit ] Again, after some time usually 6 to 12 monthsone grows accustomed to the new culture and develops routines. One knows what to expect in most situations and the host country no longer feels all that new.

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One becomes concerned with basic living again, and things become more "normal". One starts to develop problem-solving skills for dealing with the culture and begins to accept the culture's ways with a positive attitude. The culture begins to make sense, and negative reactions and responses to the culture are reduced.

Mastery does not mean total conversion; people often keep many traits from their earlier culture, such as accents and languages.

It is often referred to as the bicultural stage. Reverse culture shock[ edit ] Reverse culture shock also known as "re-entry shock" or "own culture shock" [7] may take place—returning to one's home culture after growing accustomed to a new one can produce the same effects as described above.

This phenomenon, the reactions that members of the re-entered culture exhibit toward the re-entrant, and the inevitability of the two are encapsulated in the following saying, which is also the title of a book by Thomas WolfeYou Can't Go Home Again.

Reverse culture shock is generally made up of two parts: When an extended period of time is spent abroad we focus on the good from our past, cut out the bad, and create an idealized version of the past.

Secondly, once removed from our familiar setting and placed in a foreign one we incorrectly assume that our previous world has not changed.

We expect things to remain exactly the same as when we left them. The realization that life back home is now different, that the world has continued without us, and the process of readjusting to these new conditions as well as actualizing our new perceptions about the world with our old way of living causes discomfort and psychological anguish.

They isolate themselves from the host country's environment, which they come to perceive as hostile, withdraw into an often mental " ghetto " and see return to their own culture as the only way out.

These "Rejectors" also have the greatest problems re-integrating back home after return.

Directed by Adam Curtis Popular examples included Ourselves Among Others: Cross-cultural studies[ edit ] Cross-cultural studies is an adaptation of the term cross-cultural to describe a branch of literary and cultural studies dealing with works or writers associated with more than one culture.

This is called cultural assimilation. They normally remain in the host country forever. Some people manage to adapt to the aspects of the host culture they see as positive, while keeping some of their own and creating their unique blend. They have no major problems returning home or relocating elsewhere.

This group can be thought to be cosmopolitan. Transition shock is a state of loss and disorientation predicated by a change in one's familiar environment that requires adjustment.

Culture shock in outsourced film

There are many symptoms of transition shock, including:3-D Printer 1. A 3-D printer is a machine that prints objects by laying down successive layers of plastic or other materials. 3-D printers have existed since the s. 3-D Printer 1. A 3-D printer is a machine that prints objects by laying down successive layers of plastic or other materials.

3-D printers have existed since the s. The Pop Culture ESL Teacher. I am now living in Siem Reap, Cambodia! This is the eleventh country I have lived in (countries visited).). This is also the 25th city I have lived in!

Cross-Cultural in Outsourced Film Essay. Words Jan 6th, and the eventual destruction of an entire culture's traditional ways of life. Today, stereotypical representations of the "cowboys and Indians" of the s continue to perpetuate hurtful misconceptions that further thwart attempts at understanding between the cultures.

Outsourced is a lighthearted look at the ugly American in India. You can't help but feel sorry for its protagonist, Todd, who must chose between joblessness or training his replacement in India after being forced to fire his entire department.

J ERIC COOK is an actor, writer and producer. He has written four full-length plays, workshopped with LAByrinth Theater Company, and a one-man show J. Eric Cook's Vagina Project in honor of Women's History Month. Mr.

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